The Web’s Big Dogs

The Washington Post has posted a table showing the biggest 50 websites, as judged by total unique visitors, compared from February 2005 to February 2006. I hear fairly often that MySpace is the most visited site on the internet, well, it’s not, yet anyway. It has shown the craziest jump in the one year span, showing over 300% growth in one year. Topping the list, Yahoo! at 115 million visitors in Feb. 06, with a full 25% lead over Google, it’s nearest competitor.

<h3>The Web's 10 Biggest Sites:</h3>

<ol>

    <li>Yahoo!</li>
    <li>Google</li>
    <li>MSN</li>
    <li>AOL</li>
    <li>eBay</li>
    <li>Microsoft</li>
    <li>Passport</li>
    <li>MapQuest</li>
    <li>Hotmail</li>
    <li>MySpace</li>

</ol>

<h3>Most Surprising Sites (To Me) on the Top 50:</h3>

<ol>
    <li>Wikipedia</li>
    <li>Blogger</li>
    <li>Tripod</li>
    <li>CheapTickets</li>
    <li>BizRate</li>
    <li>Real</li>
</ol>

4 responses to “The Web’s Big Dogs”

  1. Zervas says:

    myspace can be the most visited site, depending on how you look at the numbers. It has a pretty fanatical base that sign in like 10 times a day so if you look at hits rather than unique hits it’s going to look pretty good.

  2. Chris Coyier says:

    Typically, unique visitors are defined as people visiting the site that haven’t visited it in 30 minutes or more. So if you sign it in the morning, afternoon, and night, you count as three unique visitors.

    Things are a lot more accurate that way, since it avoids the ability skew numbers by “refreshing” techniques and more likely mimics real web behaviour (ie if you are coming back 30 minutes later, its probably because you have a new reason for being at that site).

  3. Zervas says:

    ah, well then the myspace numbers are even less impressive then. although the site claims 70 something million users it’s mostly driven by teenager girls who constantly check it throughout the day. so a few million people who are heavy users are probably skewing the numbers a bit.
    I also thought it was interesting that they just chose 1 month (february) to study. I’m sure seasonal trends affect sites differently but I can’t imagine that irs.gov would have been in the top 50 outside of the first 4 months of the year.

  4. Chris Coyier says:

    That’s a good point. I’d be much more interested in statistics covering either end of the spectrum, such as:
    – The website with the most unique visitors today
    – The website with the most unique visitors the last 12 months

    There are also much more interesting statistics I’d be interested in, such as:
    – The website where users spend the most time on. Sure, Yahoo! sees the numbers in visitors, but how long do they stay there? Probably not very long. I think I heard one time the number one site for users spending time on was some poker site with profiles and stuff of different online poker players. It was ridiculous at like 30-40 hours a week or something.
    – Websites with weird ratios, like they see tons of traffic but nobody ever spends more than 10 seconds there.

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