The personal website of Chris Coyier

“People felt good about being alone more often than they felt bad about it”

Leon Neyfakh has a great article “The Power of Lonely” on boston.com.

The sad truth of social perception:

Spending time alone, by contrast, can look a little suspect. In a world gone wild for wikis and interdisciplinary collaboration, those who prefer solitude and private noodling are seen as eccentric at best and defective at worst, and are often presumed to be suffering from social anxiety, boredom, and alienation.

The article goes on to mention a ton of research on how time alone has a zillion benefits and is super good for you. It doesn’t mention introversion, but the connection I would make is that alone time is super easy and necessary for introverts and extroverts will need to make a more deliberate special effort to gain the benefits of alone time. That is, if they would benefit in the same way (I’m not sure they would).

A 2003 survey of 320 UMass undergraduates led Long and his coauthors to conclude that people felt good about being alone more often than they felt bad about it

High five, UMass students.